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Why Is Texting and Driving Still a Problem on Alabama’s Roads?

texting and driving accident

When your music, GPS, and digital life are all on one convenient handheld device, it’s easy to have it become an attention magnet. However, even a “quick” glance at your phone while driving can lead to a tragic car accident. So why can’t people stop texting while driving?

At Andy Citrin Injury Attorneys, we’re passionate about safety. We believe everyone has the right to safely use Alabama’s roads, whether you’re driving, a passenger, or enjoying yourself on foot or on a bike. In this blog, our team examines our state’s texting addiction and its negative impact on road safety.

Distracted Driving Fatalities Are Unchanged in Alabama

The State of Alabama and safety groups have campaigned for years, encouraging us not to drive and text. However, our state’s number of distracted driving fatalities is nearly unchanged since 2017. Nationwide, experts believe that using a cell phone causes 1.6 car million crashes every year.

The terrifying statistics don’t stop there. When drivers text behind the wheel, they’re 23 times more likely to get in a crash, according to Carsurance. And texting and driving is considered six times more dangerous than driving drunk. So why do drivers keep texting when it’s clear how dangerous the habit is?

The Psychology of Phone Use Behind the Wheel

According to CNN, 98% of adult drivers say texting while driving is “bad,” but that they do it anyway. Unfortunately, humans can quickly become addicted to their cell phones. When we hear a “ping” or see a notification, our brain floods with dopamine, a feel-good hormone. This can cause some people to prioritize their social media feeds over safety. They assume that they can multitask while driving, even though a split second of inattention can cause a fatal crash.

New research suggests that using a cell phone while driving causes something called “inattention blindness.” Inattention blindness causes drivers to have reduced response times to crucial driving reflexes, like braking or obeying traffic signals. Even glancing down at your phone for a few seconds can have serious repercussions.

In just a few seconds, a car going 55 miles per hour can travel the length of a football field — plenty of time for the distracted driver to hit, injure, or kill another driver, pedestrian, or cyclist on the road.

RELATED: Alabama’s Distracted Driving Laws Don’t Work

Hurt By a Driver Who Was Texting? A Lawyer Can Help You Recover

After a crash with a distracted driver, it might seem like you have limited options for recovering the financial resources you need to heal and move on. However, when you work with an experienced car crash lawyer, they can help you get your life back on track by:

  • Helping you preserve evidence that supports your case
  • Subpoenaing phone records to prove the driver was texting or making other reckless choices at the time of the crash
  • Standing up for you in court or against the insurance company who might try and cheat you out of the compensation you deserve
  • Taking the lead on the investigation, so you can focus on your healing without worrying about bills or logistics
  • Helping you calculate how much of a settlement you’re owed

If you need help after a crash, it’s in your best interest to call an experienced car crash attorney to help you understand your options as soon as possible.

Hurt by a Distracted Driver? Don’t Wait to Call Andy Citrin Injury Attorneys

At Andy Citrin Injury Attorneys, we take safety seriously. That’s why we’ve helped countless victims, just like you, recover millions of dollars in compensation. If you have questions about your options after getting hurt by a driver who was on their phone, don’t wait. Call our office at 251-888-8888 or send us a message using our simple online contact form to schedule a free, no-risk consultation with one of our experienced attorneys.

We look forward to hearing from you!

 

References

(2006, February 1). Driven to Distraction. American Psychological Association. Retrieved from https://www.apa.org/research/action/drive

(2019, April). Distracted Driving in Fatal Crashes, 2017. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Retrieved from https://crashstats.nhtsa.dot.gov/Api/Public/ViewPublication/812700

Djurkovic, N. (2019, December 27). 24 Texting and Driving Statistics (Updated for 2020). Carsurance. Retrieved from https://carsurance.net/blog/texting-and-driving-statistics/

 

The content provided here is for informational purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice on any subject.